Saturday, June 27, 2009

The Living Tradition - North Carolina Potters Speak

The book signing and sale of gently used pots turned out to be a great success for the NCPC.
There was a crowd there early to get their choice of the older used pots.
Pots sold through out the day and by the end of the day the tables were sparse.
With just a few pots left which will be added to the NCPC's gift shop.

The book signing for, "The Living Tradition" drew yet another crowd.
Folks lined up in order to have their books signed by featured potters and contributors .
Vernon and Pam Owen
Hal and Eleanor Pugh
Mark Hewitt
Tom Suomalain
Terry Zug
Michelle Francis
Caroleen Sanders
Jen Berline

There are books available through the NCPC Gift shop.
Call or stop in to pick one up.

Phone: (336) 873-8430
233 East Avenue, Seagrove, NC 27341

If you would like to make a donation:
Go to the home page for information.
Donate today!

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Exceptional Sale of Historic, Gently Worn Pots & Book Signing

North Carolina Pottery Center
Exceptional Sale of Historic, Gently Worn Pots & Book Signing

The North Carolina Pottery Center has planned an exciting, educational and free day for the public on Saturday, June 20th from 10-4.
Visitors from near and far, young and old are invited to spend the day at the Center to be entertained and educated about the history, heritage and ongoing tradition of pottery making in North Carolina, one of the state’s most well-loved and treasured art forms.
The “Pots from the Attic” Fundraiser runs all day and features a collection of over 200 highly unique pieces. Shapes and sizes vary from crocks to candle holders to sugar bowls and Rebecca pitchers as well as marked souvenir pots from the past tourist trade. A majority of pots were donated from the collection of Dr. Everette James. NCPC board member, Pam Owens from Jugtown commented, "I know I speak for the whole NCPC Board in expressing our gratitude to Everette James for the donation of his historic, and well known pottery collection from the Saint James Place Museum in Roberson, NC. There are many wonderful study pieces in the "Pots from the Attic" Fundraiser. We look forward to a full and interesting day of events on June 20."
Mark Hewitt, accomplished Pittsboro potter and VP of the NCPC describes the collection like this. “In many ways pots are like people, we give them human associations by describing their feet, bellies, necks, and lips. Pots, like people, are also fragile. Over the course of a lifetime, we all get chipped and banged about, but carry on, somehow tougher for our experiences. Likewise the pots in this sale have been slightly damaged, but they still retain their core beauty, somehow made more real by their flaws. The pots in the sale have been well-loved. There are examples of all types of North Carolina pottery, from utilitarian to art ware, small pieces and large. The sale includes many hidden treasures, rare stamps, and familiar gems.” The range of pots includes those from Cole Pottery in Sanford, Jugtown, Ben Owen-Master Potter and North State among many others. This is a great opportunity to begin or add to an existing collection in a very affordable way. All pots are priced to sell.
In tandem, a reception and book signing of The Living Tradition: North Carolina Potters Speak takes place from 2-4. The recently released book includes intimate interviews with 23 of North Carolina’s most distinguished potters. With illuminating interviews conducted by Michelle Francis and Charles “Terry” Zug III, resplendent photography by Rob Amberg, editing by Denny Hubbard Mecham, and publishing by Goosepen Studio & Press, this is the culmination of a documentary project by the North Carolina Pottery Center to promote and preserve North Carolina’s unique pottery making history. The funding for this distinctive project was made possible by a grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Sciences, a national organization. Featured artists from the book attending the reception include; Ben Owen III, Pam and Vernon Owens, Hal and Eleanor Pugh, Caroleen Sanders, Mark Hewitt and interviewer Terry Zug. Refreshments will be served. All proceeds from The Living Tradition and the “Pots from the Attic” Fundraiser directly benefit the North Carolina Pottery Center. Sample pages can be viewed at
A full day can easily be spent at the Center with individuals and families free this Saturday to take in the significance of the permanent historical section, beginning with the Native American pottery exhibit and artifacts, through the tools and functional pots of the agricultural era, to the movement toward art pottery and to the more contemporary pots of today. Two large display cases hold samples of approximately 85% of the local Seagrove community potters. The Center rotates exhibits every 3 to 4 months and the current exhibit features works by Dan Finch and the Dan Finch Studio Potters. Visitors are welcome to pack a picnic lunch to enjoy on the outdoor tables underneath the grove of 100-year-old oak trees, and wander the charming rural grounds. Here one can explore the outside groundhog kiln and double chambered wood–firing kiln designed and built by potters Ruggles and Rankin (also featured in The Living Traditions book) during a teaching event.
Day-long demonstrations are held on Saturdays in the Center’s Educational Building by local potter Chad Brown. Chad is a 5th generation potter; his great-great grandfather was William Henry Chriscoe, a portion of whose original log cabin pottery studio now resides in the Smithsonian Museum. Chad is an up-and-coming potter to watch on the Seagrove scene, having worked as a journeyman potter for numerous studios and assisting many local potters with their wood firings. His decision to pursue his own pottery full-time this year was rewarded last month when he received the “The Award of Excellence” at The Arts in the Park show in Blowing Rock, North Carolina. Sid Luck of Luck’s Ware, coordinator of the 2008-09 TAPS (Traditional Arts Program for Students) said, “I was most fortunate to have Chad as an assistant in the TAPS program this year. He is an excellent potter, has a great rapport with students and is very dependable.” TAPS is an afterschool collaboration between the NC Arts Council, the NC Pottery Center, and Seagrove Elementary School. Its purpose is to provide public school students with the knowledge and practices of the Seagrove traditional pottery culture. Mark Hewitt remarked, "Chad Brown has quietly established his presence as one of the most talented younger potters in Seagrove. We all enjoy Chad's humor and good nature, and know how much he contributes to the NCPC with his patient, insightful demonstrations and his warm, generous personality. His beautiful pots reflect who he is."
Opened in 1998 in Seagrove, the NCPC mission is to promote public awareness of North Carolina’s remarkable pottery heritage. The Center welcomes and informs visitors to the Seagrove area, enriching their experience through exhibitions and educational programs, and promoting potters working today across the state. The NCPC is a private nonprofit entity, funded primarily through memberships, grants, admissions, and appropriations. OPEN: Tuesdays – Saturdays 10:00 am to 4:00, ADMISSION (excluding free special events): $2 - adults, $1 - students 9th through 12th grades, Free - children through 8th grade, free - NCPC members. Handicap accessible. Groups and tours welcomed. For further information and details call 336- 873-8430, email